12 August 2022 The Irish Film & Television Network
     
Access Cinema Viewing Sessions Set for Sligo
14 Mar 2002 :
access CINEMA announces the line up for its annual Viewing:Sessions which take place this year at the model arts :: niland gallery, Sligo from April 5-7.

Viewing:Sessions 2002 offers, for both access CINEMA members and others interested in regional cultural exhibition in Ireland, an informal forum and an opportunity to discuss, debate, explore and engage with regional cultural cinema exhibition against a backdrop of film screenings on 35mm and DVD. An important element to the weekend is the chance to network with other practitioners in this area. Also included is a ‘hands on’ information session on DVD to allow you to get the best quality possible from DVD projection and presentation at your venue.

Films to be screened include Italian for Beginners, the fifth film to be made under Dogme rules but the first by a woman. Director Lone Scherfig says “I wanted to make a light-hearted, effervescent film with plenty of room to welcome all the gems my cast might present me with.” In a city suburb a young minister Andreas arrives to take up duties at a local church. Persuaded by his assistant to join an Italian night school class he soon becomes the centre of a story of love among losers, where gradually each one in the group manages to overcome his/her predicament and find a happy solution.

Winner of the Don Quixote (International Federation of Film Societies Jury Prize) at the Finale Pilsen film festival in 2000, Divided We Fall is a black comedy set during World War II. A childless couple in an occupied Czechoslovakian town secretly take in a young Jewish man who has escaped from a concentration camp. When a neighbour and Nazi sympathiser begins to suspect, the couple go to extraordinary lengths to protect their friend.

Spanish director Julio Medem’s erotic but essentially romantic Sex and Lucia weaves a captivating tale that ends on a pleasingly optimistic note. Lucia may appear in the title but it is her lover Lorenzo, a struggling novelist, who is the central character. After a fantastical one-night stand, a nameless lover secretly bears Lorenzo a daughter. Years later, happily settled with new love Lucia, he finds out about the daughter and begins visiting her anonymously.

Bosnian-born Danis Tanovic’s acclaimed debut feature, No Man’s Land, has earned him international recognition and numerous awards, including Best Screenplay at Cannes and the European Screenwriter 2001 statuette at the European Film Awards. His sardonic, darkly humorous tale follows a deadly, tragic’comic trajectory, the logic of which is distilled from its writer/director’s own experience of his homeland’s civil war.

Loosely based on James Carney’s book The Playboy and the Yellow Lady (one of the inspirations for Synge’s Playboy of the Western World), director Cathal Black’s Love & Rage is set on the island of Achill at the end of the 19th century. Greta Scacchi plays local landlord Agnes McDonnell, a fiercely independent woman who is sexually attracted to the mysterious and dangerous James Lynchehaun (Daniel Craig) who persuades her to employ him as her land agent.

In I’m Going Home, veteran director Manoel de Oliveira indulges his sense of the absurd in this poised tragi-comedy about art and ageing. Michel Piccoli plays Gilbert Valance, a venerated French actor who reappraises his life after he learns that his wife, daughter and son-in-law have been killed in a car accident. Seemingly out of place both in the modern world and in the realm of showbiz, Valence nevertheless takes up his agent’s suggestion of playing Buck Mulligan in a film adaptation of James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses’.

Y Tu Mamá También (And Your Mother Too) is Mexico's biggest box office smash in years, a raunchy coming of age sex comedy that takes a provocative storyline, and presents it with real warmth and intelligence. Tenoch and Julio are longstanding friends, despite the fact that one of them is from a wealthy, privileged family and the other is from a much more modest background. One summer, with their girlfriends safely away exploring Europe, the two young men set off on a voyage of discovery of their own, assisted by the good looking Spanish wife of an older relative. As the trio travel in search of an imaginary idyllic beach, the irrepressibly laddish boys learn invaluable lessons in love, and grow up a little along the way.

Part of the recent retrospective at the National Film Theatre in London and newly reissued on DVD is Akira Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood starring his most frequent collaborator Toshiro Mifune, as General Washizu, a warrior in a rain-drenched, wind-swept, fog-shrouded medieval Japan. Possibly the finest of all film versions of Shakespeare, this re-imaging of ‘Macbeth’ demonstrates precisely how power corrupts, and does so with a prodigality of invention- including some new scenes (the birds in the banquet hall) that Shakespeare himself might have envied.

Guillermo del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone, a haunting and unsettling picture set in a remote boarding school during the dying days of the Spanish Civil War, as seen through the innocent eyes of a young orphaned boy deposited there after his father has been killed at the front. Part supernatural melodrama, part ghost story, part political allegory in which all the elements combine under del Toro’s assured direction.

For further information and booking please contact access CINEMA directly on tel: 01 679 4420/ fax: 01 679 4166/ email: info@accesscinema.ie. access CINEMA acknowledges the support of The Arts Council of Ireland/ An Chomhairle Ealaíon, model arts :: niland gallery, Sligo Film Society.



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